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Lymphatic system



Lymphatic system: drainage of excess interstitial fluid


What is and functions of the lymphatic system

The lymphatic system has the function of draining excess interstitial fluid (fluid where cells are submerged and from which they draw their nutrients and eliminate waste substances from their metabolism) in order to return it to the blood and thus maintain fluid balance. on body.

It also transports the vitamins and lipids absorbed during the digestion process into the blood to carry nutrients throughout the body.

Another function of lymphatic tissue is to carry out immune responses; it prevents lymph from releasing microorganisms into the bloodstream by retaining and destroying them within their lymph nodes.

Lymph nodes

To understand what lymph nodes are, a very simple way is to think of them as filters, since lymph passes through several of them before reaching the bloodstream, and, as we have seen above, disease-causing agents are retained in them. its elimination.

Blood capillaries

It is important to know that blood capillaries and lymphatic capillaries have very different functions, because in the case of the former, there is the entry and exit of substances, whereas in the latter, only their entry occurs.

The lymphatic capillary does not make exchanges, it only collects the liquid with what it has in it, the exchanges are performed by the blood. It is the blood that transports nutrients and removes toxins, that is, it is through the blood that the necessary changes are made for the body's balance.

In short, the lymphatic system acts to maintain the health of our body by removing agents such as bacteria, fungi, viruses (these penetrate the bloodstream), dead cells, red blood cells that came out of the bloodstream and metastases (blood cells that come off the tumor).